Anthology of Louisville Incorporates Family Holiday Traditions During Pandemic

Nov 16, 2020 | Sponsored

Anthology of Louisville is located at 1105 Dorsey Lane in Louisville.

All throughout our lives it is important to be known by other people and not just known by name. To be truly known, we need to be recognized for our talents, our senses of humor, our likes and dislikes. Anthology of Louisville strives to truly know their residents so that staff can recognize and care for their needs as well as deepen relationships.

Anthology is in the process of adopting an art program that is a means of socializing, learning about the person sitting next to you, and building self-confidence. Residents will soon be able to participate in Opening Minds Through Art (OMA), which was created at the Scripps Gerontology Center at Miami University in Ohio.

Anastasia Noffsinger, executive director at Anthology of Louisville, says the art program is unique because not only does it have residents actually creating art, but “they are relying on imagination rather than memory. It focuses on the skills they have instead of the skills they’ve lost.” She says that art opens up conversations among residents as to their interests and abilities that staff or other residents might not be aware of. An individual who is experiencing cognitive decline but has an aptitude in art may find themselves in a teaching role, which provides them with a renewed sense of purpose and gives a boost to their self-esteem.

Anthology of Louisville is committed to listening to the experts it hires, particularly those individuals who work in the community with residents on a day-to-day basis. These men and women know the residents, their needs, and what programs will best suit them.

Learning about residents is also key to how Anthology is preparing to celebrate the holidays, which will certainly look different due to COVID-19. “We’re asking families to share their holiday traditions with us and allow us to incorporate those in the community,” she says. Not only will these traditions benefit the individual resident whose family does the tradition, but it will benefit everyone in the community as a whole because they will learn about their peers and then share their own traditions.

Anastasia Noffsinger, Executive Director, Anthology of Louisville

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