Hiring the Perfect Match for Your Business

Oct 16, 2020 | Career

Finding the perfect match for a position in your company doesn’t have to be a daunting process. Whether you’re looking for someone with a flexible schedule, excellent computer skills, or the ability to problem solve and tell a good knock-knock joke, there are solid steps to take while searching for that singular employee to complement your company’s vision. Sometimes it’s the simple things that make a good first impression. Marketing your company with an up-to-date website is a wonderful way to engage a potential new hire. “If the company has a website, that’s the first thing people will go to,” says Tiffany Cardwell, a principal advisor on MCM’s HR Advisory Services Team, with over 20 years of experience in human resources. She suggests doing a once-over of the company’s website to make sure contact information and links are active and up to date.

A good way to maintain your website and keep your web-presence relevant is to be active on social media. “It’s so easy for a possible applicant to Google Search right now,” Tiffany says. She also suggests getting a little creative when you’re ready to write your job description so your ad will stand out from the crowd in cyberspace. Cindy Read, deputy director with KentuckianaWorks — an organization that engages “employers, educators, and job seekers with resources to build a stronger community through the dignity of work” — says to remember to include the deeper mission of the open job position. “Make sure that the person knows they have the opportunity to feel good about what they’ve accomplished at the end of the day,” Cindy says. Another tip Tiffany gives is to keep your post “industry-specific versus general,” and think through the “qualifying things they want in the role.”

Toni Clem, president and CEO of Scoppechio, one of the largest private marketing and media firms in the country, says, “We believe online marketing is an absolute inclusion in our plans. With over 90% of job seekers going to Linkedin, Glassdoor, Indeed, Monster, Facebook, etc. to search for a job, we include it automatically.” Applicants are looking across all channels to partner with a business model that suits them. Once they’ve discovered the great benefits your company offers, the resumes and applications will begin to flow. After you’ve assembled your most-liked applicants, it’s time for the interview process.

While preparing for this, Tiffany says, “It’s important to have some direct questions that will show you if that person has had the experience you’re looking for.” Then, make sure the questions you chose are relevant — just like the panel of co-workers you’ll be assembling to ask them. “When you put the interview panel together, put together a group of people who the candidate could see themselves working with,” Cindy says. This interview panel will be working together to discover a possible new team member. “The best way to conduct a candidate experience is to have a lead interviewing team who interviews the candidate on different performance competencies,” Toni says. She suggests the interview be structured in this way so your potential new hire won’t be asked the same question multiple times depending on who’s interviewing. This also illustrates that you value your candidate and their time. This can set the early groundwork for mutual respect and a professional level friendship to develop.

So once you’ve found the “perfect match” for your company, how do you tell them? A snail-mail letter might take too long, and do people still phone one another anymore? Yes, Cindy says, calls are made when the offers are finalized. Each organization has its own standard offer, and Toni says this offer can include a number of “incentives” like “a strong benefits package, which would include medical, dental, vision, 401K, long term/short term, life, and disability.” This sparkling new contract and benefits package, blended together with your exceptional work environment, will bring your new team member to their very first day of work. “A strong positive onboarding experience is critical. It’s important that new hires have a seamless integration experience with their manager and team,” Toni says. On that first day, this can look like walking them through schedules and/or having key personnel take them to lunch. “Continue to have someone be the point person to keep them in the loop for their first week,” Tiffany says.

You’re off to a rousing start and a healthy working relationship. Now it’s all about strengthening that relationship. There’s a lot that can be done to keep people engaged in a work environment. “Along the path is always managing their expectations,” Toni says. Establishing a habit of honest communication can extend trust so that your working partnership can grow. “It’s all about radical transparency in regards to what we’re doing right and what we can do better,” she says. Should the channel of communication fall to the side and your employee decide to move to another job opportunity, don’t fret. First, speak to them to assess why they’ve decided to leave, and see if perhaps adjustments can be made. “Sometimes you’re in a place to offer a different position or give a raise, and then sometimes this isn’t an available option,” Cindy says. If adjustments simply aren’t an option, Toni says, “Be true to yourself as a company. Our team members that leave, we want them to be happy wherever they go.” Hiring the best match for your company means finding your most compatible team player. Once that goal is scored, keeping the lines of communication flexible and open can make your working relationship a partnership that thrives for the long term.

P.S. Seeking a job during the pandemic.