Caregiver Guide: Stonecrest of Louisville

Nov 1, 2019 | Sponsored

Stonecrest of Louisville offers both personal and memory care on its senior living campus: Elements, the personal care neighborhood, and Virtue, the memory care. Within both levels of care, residents are assured to find engaging programming that keeps them active in the small community and beyond. 

From personal experience, Director of Sales and Marketing Ashleigh Skaggs knows that choosing a senior community can be stressful, especially if a loved one needs memory care. “It is one of the most difficult things a family will ever have to go through,” she says. “Most families don’t realize what a daunting task it can be until they are in the middle of it. Every community offers something unique for seniors, and we realize that what we offer may not be suitable for everyone. My goal is to find you the best community, and I will provide you with the resources to find the best fit.”

Residents who might want to move into Stonecrest of Louisville begin a discovery process with Stonecrest staff. The process is called EPIC and stands for Explore, Problems, Impact, and Conclusion. It helps staff understand where residents are emotionally and cognitively, what problems they are experiencing, the impact of these problems on their quality of life, and how Stonecrest can help the residents and their families. 

If an individual and family decide that Stonecrest is the best fit, Move-in Coordinator Emily Roney helps them select an apartment and goes over the move-in binder, which simplifies the paperwork. She inspects the apartment to ensure it is pristine and ready for the new resident. “I want to make [moving in] as carefree as I can. I have even gone so far as to physically help people move,” she says. New residents get a custom gift to welcome them to the Stonecrest family. 

Stonecrest’s Life Engagement Program is tailored to suit residents’ interests and needs. Mallory Disbrow, Director of Elements, takes great effort to fill the activity calendar with programming that interests and involves residents. “Our residents like an elevated, scholarly approach to engagement,” she says. One of their favorites is TED Talk Tuesdays, where they stream videos from the TED website featuring experts addressing issues within their fields of study. She also hosts many live speakers, such as philosophy professors or one-woman shows, in the community to engage residents as well.

“Every Tuesday and Thursday without fail, we have the biggest happy hour you’ve ever seen in a senior living community,” Disbrow says. “Residents love to invite their friends and families.” Many families come for happy hour and then go on to have dinner with their loved ones afterwards in the community dining room.  

While residents in Virtue’s memory care do similar programming to that in Elements, it may be toned down in length or vigor. Stonecrest is in the process of rolling out new programming in memory care that uses technology to help improve cognition. 

It’s Never Too Late (IN2L) is a software program that residents can customize to allow them to view clips from around the world and travel to new places, as well as stay involved with family and friends whether they are local or far away. Family members can send photos or upload videos to share with memory care residents, which is a great way for busy adult children and grandchildren to stay in touch with their loved ones. 

Fit Minds is a cognitive stimulation therapy program that builds on a variety of skills: music, language, spatial orientation, critical thinking, computation, and memory/recall. Opening Minds Through Art (OMA) will allow Stonecrest to partner with a high school or college to bring students in to work one-on-one with residents to examine, discuss and make art. 

“These programs will be a great way to maintain relationships with their loved ones while they are in senior living,” Disbrow says. “If we can foster relationships through them, it will make residents’ quality of life that much better.” The open layout of Stonecrest will allow staff to be involved with residents as they use these programs, offering help or answering questions. While these programs will be housed in memory care, seniors in personal care will also be able to use these technology tools. 

P.S. Three tips for first time caregivers.

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